The Science Behind Yoga

Recently Kansas City infoZine published a report about the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM), part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), research on yoga's safety and effectiveness and pointed to a video.

It states there's a growing body of evidence that yoga may be beneficial for low-back pain (as if we didn't know). However, yoga has not been found helpful for treating asthma, and studies investigating yoga for arthritis have had mixed results.

The video also spotlights a set of consumer tips to help viewers make decisions if they are interested in practicing yoga. For example:

  • Yoga is generally considered to be safe in healthy people when practiced appropriately under the guidance of a well-trained instructor. However, people with high blood pressure, glaucoma, or sciatica, and women who are pregnant should modify or avoid some yoga poses.
  • Everyone's body is different, and yoga postures should be modified based on individual abilities. Inform your instructor about any medical issues you have, and ask about the physical demands of yoga.
  • If you're thinking about practicing yoga, be sure to talk to your health care providers. Give them a full picture of what you do to manage your health.

Here's a link to the full story which also links to the video

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